Title I Schoolwide Plan

 

TITLE I SCHOOLWIDE PLAN

 

Date: 2010-2011

 

Dr. Kathy Harwood, Ph.D

Charter Conservatory Director

 

Ms. Kania Greer, Ed.S

Charter Conservatory Title I Director

 

Memie Collins

Technical Consultant
   Title I Planning Team

 

 

We have developed our schoolwide plan with the participation of individuals who will carry out the comprehensive schoolwide program plan.  These people involved are inside stakeholders as well as objective outsiders.

 

Name                                                                                                  Title

Kania Greer, Ed.S                                                                                TI Coordinator

Kathy Harwood, Ph. D                                                                         School Director/Administrator

Memie Collins, Ed.S                                                                            Technical Coordinator

Chuck Blakley                                                                                     High School Teacher

Corliss Reese                                                                                     Middle School Teacher

Ellen Boyle                                                                                          Parent

Jim LoBue, Ph.D                                                                                  Governing Board Chairman

Barbara Reeves                                                                                  Business Manager

Kayla Robarge                                                                                     Student (High School)

 

Charter Conservatory

Charter Conservatory School District

Title I School-Wide Plan   FY 2010-2011

 

CONTENTS                                                                                                                                              PAGE 

 

An Overview of Charter Conservatory                                                                                 

1.       Comprehensive Needs Assessment                                                                           

 

2.       Scientifically Based Research and Reform Strategies                                                    

 

3.       Instruction by Highly Qualified Staff and Strategies Used To                                                       Attract Highly Qualified Teachers

 

4.       High Quality and On-going Professional Development                                                                   

 

5.       Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement                                                           

 

6.       Plans for Assisting Pre-School Children in the Transition From                                        

          Early Childhood Programs to the Local Elementary School Program

 

7.       Inclusions of Teachers in the Decisions Regarding Use of Assessment                                          for the Purpose of Improving Academic Achievement

 

8.       Coordination and Integration of Federal, State, and Local Services                                             and Programs

 

9.       Activities to Ensure Students Experiencing Difficulty Mastering                                                    Standards are Provided Effective, Timely Assistance

 

10.     Description of How Individual Student Assessment Results and                                                  Interpretation will be Provided to Parents

 

11.    Provisions for the Collection and Disaggregation of Data on the                            

         Achievement and Assessment Results of Students

 

12.    Provisions to Ensure Disaggregated Assessment Results are              

        Valid and Reliable

 

13.    Provisions for Public Reporting of Disaggregated Data                                            

 

14.    The School-wide Plan Was Developed During a One-Year Period                      

 

15.    Development of the Title I Plan Including All Stakeholders                                                

 

16.    Availability of Plan to LEA, Parents, and the Public                                                          

 

17.    School-wide Plan is Translated to the Extent Feasible into Any Language            

         To Accommodate Parents of Participating Students

 

18.    Plan Subject to School Improvement Provisions of Section 1116                            

 

19.    APPENDICES                                                                                                    

 

 

OVERVIEW OF BULLOCH COUNTY AND CHARTER CONSERVATORY

Charter Conservatory is located in Statesboro, Georgia in Bulloch County.  The city of Statesboro is home to Georgia Southern University a regional research University which brings an international community to Statesboro. We are also home to a satellite campus for East Georgia College, and Ogeechee Technical College.  Bulloch County is home to three towns, Statesboro, Brooklet, and Portal, and many other smaller communities such as Nevils, Ellabell, and Register.  The 2008 residential population of Bulloch County was approximately 67,791 and this is our primary attendance area.  However, surrounding communities such as Pooler, Millen, and Pembroke serve as feeder communities to Charter Conservatory.

Bulloch County is considered a rural agricultural community with a high-poverty rate.  The estimated median household income in 2007 was $34,861.  Over 40% of Charter Conservatory students are eligible for a free or reduced lunch.  According to the US Census Bureau, in 2007 Bulloch County residents with income below the poverty level was 23.4% compared to the state average of 14.3%.   

Of the residents of Bulloch County, 77.9% have earned at least a high school diploma and 25.4% have earned a Bachelor’s Degree or higher.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate for Bulloch County was 10.7% in 2009.

Over the past 10 years Bulloch County has seen industry ebb and flow.  The loss of major industrial firms has been only slightly remedied by incoming industries.  However, the unemployment rate remains high.  Several families have found it necessary to commute to larger urban areas up to 90 miles in order to find employment.  Because Bulloch County is agricultural, there is a percentage of migrant workers that periodically live in the county; however, exact numbers are not available. 

 

1.      COMPREHENSIVE NEEDS ASSESSMENT

 

The instruments, surveys, and procedures used to conduct this needs assessment follow in this section.

 

Charter Conservatory serves students in multi-grade classrooms in 6-12 grades.  In addition to Charter Conservatory, Bulloch County hosts three traditional high schools and three traditional middle schools. In addition, Bulloch County has a Performance Learning Center, an Ombudsman Program, and Alternative School, and Psychoeducational Center.  Charter Conservatory is currently home to 131 students with an enrollment cap of 175.  Charter Conservatory’s ethnic make-up is: 82% white, 15% African-American, 1% Asian, and 2% multi-racial.  Approximately, 13 % are enrolled in special education classes.  We have nine full-time teachers and four part-time teachers.  We currently do not use paraprofessionals.  The pupil-teacher ratio is: 15:1. 42% of the population of Charter Conservatory qualifies for free and reduced lunch.

 

Charter Conservatory’s Governing Board is in place at our system level and is the guiding force in strategic planning.  The Board consists of parents, teachers, and community leaders and meets monthly.  These monthly meetings focus on the research based strategies for school improvement.  This past year, they have been focused on developing and implementing a more rigorous and relevant curriculum in the areas of math and reading.   In addition, they provide the foundation for the school improvement plan.  Once the foundation is laid, full input is sought from the faculty and parents at all grade levels. 

 

Parent and stake holder surveys were sent out requesting feedback concerning the school.  The information is used yearly to revise our school improvement plan.  The results of the survey are available, in written format, to all of our parents at our Family Fun Nights once a month.  The overall results will also be printed in our newsletter and made available on-line.  Any parent may request the results be made available in a language other than English and Charter Conservatory will make every effort to comply with the request.

 

The Continuous Monitoring Team meets once a week, in both the middle and high schools, and consists of the schools team leaders, department heads, teachers, counselor, and director.  This team serves as the oversight committee to ensure that the instructional needs of students are being met. Each student is discussed at least once every nine weeks and revisited should the need arise.

 

The Governor’s Office of Student Accountability (GOSA) ensures that accountability for all Georgia’s Educational systems is met from Pre-Kindergarten through post-secondary levels.  This is to ensure that student achievement and improved graduation rates are met continuously throughout the educational life of a child.  There is an accountability profile developed for each school based on:

 

1.      An absolute performance determination based on Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP).

2.      A Performance Index based on annual growth in academic achievement as measured by statewide assessments.

3.      Performance Highlights which provide recognition for schools and school systems based on academic related indicators.

Charter Conservatory’s performance on these three components is presented below:
Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)

  • We have met AYP consistently for the past 7 years.
    • We are currently a Title I Targeted Assisted School

 

1.      Performance Index

  • The percentage of students meeting and exceeding standards on the Georgia High School Graduation Test in mathematics for the 2008-2009 school year was 88%.  This was a slight decrease from the 2007-2008 year of 100%.
  • The percentage of students meeting and exceeding standards on the Georgia High School Graduation Test in English/Language Arts for the 2008-2009 school year was 95%.  This was a slight decrease from the 2007-2008 year of 100%.
  • The percentage of African-American students meeting and exceeding standards on the Georgia High School Graduation Test in mathematics (100%) remained the same from 2007-2008 to 2008-2009 and the percentage of African-American students meeting and exceeding standards on the Georgia High School Graduation Test in English/Language Arts was 100% for both years as well. 
  • The percentage of students with disabilities meeting and exceeding standards on the Georgia High School Graduation Test (2008-2009) in mathematics (33%) decreased 66% from in 2007-2008 to 2008-2009 and the percentage of students with disabilities meeting and exceeding standards on the Georgia High School Graduation Test in English/Language Arts remained the same at 100%. 

 

2.      Performance Highlights

  • The graduation rate for Charter Conservatory has been above the state average for the past three years.

2007                                        2008                                        2009

                        Charter Con       92%                                 94.4%                               88.2%

                         State-wide       65%                                  70%                                  75%

 

  • The Georgia High School Writing Test Results for all students, students with disabilities, white, and minority students has remained significant when compared with state levels for the past three years.

 

2007    (state)              2008    (state)              2009   (state)

                              ALL              94%    (88%)            71%     (nd)               91%   (91%)

                              SWD            50%    (54%)              0%     (nd)                 0%    (nd)

                             WHITE           93%    (93%)             66%    (nd)               91%     (nd)

                           MINORITY        100%   (82%)             100%   (nd)              0%       (nd)

 

Additional data for Georgia Assessments, national assessments, and other Georgia OSA indicators can be found in Appendix A.

 

School Improvement Plan

Charter Conservatory’s school improvement plan (SIP) has measurable goals and is adjusted on a yearly basis to address areas of need based on analysis of student performance data.  School improvement goals are in line with AYP Annual Measurable Goals reflected in the chart below.

 

Georgia’s AYP Annual Measurable Goals

 

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Graduation Rate AMO

65.8%

71.41%

75%

80%

85%

90%

95%

100%

Math AMO

68.6%

74.9%

74.9%

75%

81.2%

87.4

93.7%

100%

English/Language Arts AMO

84.7%

87.7%

87.7%

87.7%

90.8%

93.9%

96.9%

100%

 

            Charter Conservatory School Improvement Goals

  • Goal Area: The percentage of all students meeting or exceeding standards on the mathematics GHSGT will increase by 5 percentage points each year.
    • Performance Objective: Improve academic achievement for all student subgroups.
    • Unit of Measure: % of all Full Academic Year (FAY) students as indicated on the AYP report
    • Performance Measures and Targets:

 

 

08-09 Baseline

09-10 Target

10-11 Target

11-12 Target

All FAY Students Passing Math GHSGT

66%

75%

77%

82%

 

 

 

 

  • Goal Area: The percentage of all students meeting or exceeding standards on the GHSWT, and the two ELA EOCT’s will increase by 9% each year.  The percentage of all students meeting or exceeding standards on the ELA GHSGT will increase by 2% percentage points each year.
    • Performance Objective: Improve academic achievement for all student subgroups.
    • Unit of Measure: % of all FAY students as indicated on the AYP report for the GHSGT ELA; % of all students as indicated on school performance summaries for other measures
    • Performance Measures and Targets:

 

08-09 Baseline

09-10 Target

10-11 Target

11-12 Target

All Students Passing 9th Literature EOCT

70%

75%

77%

86%

All Students Passing American Lit. EOCT

70%

75%

77%

86%

All Students Passing ELA GHSWT

88%

89%

93%

94%

ALL FAY Students Passing ELA GHSGT

88%

89%

93%

94%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Performance Objective: The percentage of all students and the percentage of students in each subgroup, graduating on time will increase by a specified percentage each year to reach set targets by 2012*.
    • Unit of Measure: % of student
    • Performance Measures and Targets:

 

08-09 Baseline

09-10 Target

10-11 Target

11-12 Target

High School Graduation Rate: All

88.2%

92%

93%

94%

High School Graduation Rate: SWD

NA

92%

93%

94%

High School Graduation Rate: African-American

50%

92%

93%

94%

High School Graduation Rate: White

86.7%

92%

93%

94%

*our average graduating class is 20, so 1 student great impacts our numbers 

  • Goal Area: The percentage of 8th grade students meeting or exceeding standards on the mathematics CRCT will increase by 9 percentage points each year.
    • Performance Objective: Improve academic achievement for all student subgroups.
    • Unit of Measure: % of all FAY (?) students as indicated on the AYP report
    • Performance Measures and Targets:

 

 

08-09 Baseline

09-10 Target

10-11 Target

11-12 Target

All FAY 8th Grade Students Passing Math CRCT

60%

68%

76%

84%

 

 

 

 

In addition to the above, the following were target area recommendations for improvement:

 

CURRICULUM

  • Develop and implement a consistent framework for all students.
  • Revisit the implementation of GPS units to ensure:

§  All courses include Constructivist and Multiple Intelligence Learning

§  All course syllabi and rubrics are placed on the school website for parents and students to access.

§  All backward designs are placed on employee website for teachers to access.

§  Rigor and relevance in all course offerings.

  • Utilize a variety of scheduling models for students to benefit from advanced coursework.
  • Provide high school students with credit recovery options.
  • Expand GHSGT/EOCT reviews to students at risk of failing the exam.
  • Students are encouraged to take responsibility for their own learning.

 

INSTRUCTION

  • Use Constructivism, Multiple Intelligences, and Backward Design as the essential theories for instructional practices.
  • Determine and implement the structures necessary to differentiate instruction in order tomatch instruction to individual learners.
  • Use strategies and processes to increase engagement, use of higher order thinking skills, and problem solving by all students.
  • Implement the teaching of constructivist reading skills in all subject areas.
  • Provide daily directed studies reading for all students.
  • Involve students in authentic math experiences using problem solving and inquiry based instructional approaches.

 

ASSESSMENT

  • Use student work, formative assessments, and summative assessments to differentiate instruction to meet student needs.
  • Provide students with models/samples and rubrics for student work to demonstrate desired results.
  • Increase rigor and expectations of students through expanding the use of self monitoring and self evaluation tools such as rubrics, narrative assessments, and evaluation checklists.
  • Analyze gaps in student assessment data and develop interventions to fill those gaps.
  • Identify and utilize diagnostic math assessments to remediate identified students in grades 6-12.
  • Standards not standardization are the basis of all assessments.

 

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (Based on student achievement)

  • Professional learning should be job-embedded and should include enhancing teacher knowledge and understanding through the use of professional readings.
  • Increase the number of teachers who engage in new learning opportunities.
  • The Professional Learning plan will include group-decision making and productive collaborative work.
  • All teachers will have a say in the professional learning opportunities made available.
  • All teachers will be required to join a professional organization in their field of study to be exposed to professional journals and peer collaboration.
  • Charter Conservatory administrators will provide professional learning on a wide range of subjects such as: how to differentiate learning for all learners, how to raise student achievement, and how to  implement RTI in order to ensure success for all learners.

 

LEADERSHIP

  • The Continuous Monitoring Team will focus on differentiation, intervention, and assessment.
  • Team leaders and administrators will address non-academic issues.
  • Diversification of some of the administrative duties to other qualified personnel.
  • Encourage all teachers to take on team leader roles periodically to increase their leadership skills.
  • Leadership team meetings will be held once a week to discuss any concerns or upcoming events.

 

In summary we found the major strengths in our program were:

1)      Our ability to successfully differentiate instruction for all students.

2)      Our graduation rate.

3)      Our adherence to our small class size beliefs.

4)      Our ability to provide individualized instruction to all students.

5)      Our philosophy of being caring adults in lives of children.

6)      Our belief in Constructivist Teaching methods and multiple intelligences.

7)      Our ability to meet the needs of all of our students to help them reach their maximum academic potential.

8)      Our ability to handle discipline issues quickly and effectively.

9)      Our strict philosophy that no-bullying of any kind will be allowed.

 

The major needs we discovered were:

 

1)      Our technology is not as up to date as we need.

2)      Our ability to notify parents of upcoming events.

3)      That we have limited high school science labs.

4)      Our ability to offer elective classes.

5)      Our facility in general.

6)      Our lack of extracurricular activities and clubs.

 

The specific academic needs of those subgroups of students that are to be addressed in the schoolwide plan will be:

1)      Mathematics to increase scores on state mandated tests

2)      Reading to increase scores on state mandated tests

 

Causes that we discovered for each of the needs were:

1)      Lack of appropriate funding for additional support systems for students who are in need.

2)      Lack of tutoring time for additional one-on-one assistance to those students who are in need.

 

 

The measurable goals to address our needs have been placed within our schoolwide paln and are in keeping with Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE) directions that we establish for specific annual, measurable objectives for continuous and substantial progress for each group of students enrolled in the school that will ensure that all groups of students will meet the State’s proficient level of achievement on the state academic assessment (Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests or Georgia High School Graduation Tests) no later than 2014.

 

2. SCHOOLWIDE REFORM STRATEGIES THAT ARE SCIENTIFICALLY RESEARCHED BASED

Disaggregated GHSGT, GHSWT, EOCT, CRCT, and classroom assessment data indicated that Charter Conservatory needed to implement scientifically based strategies to increase student achievement in Math and Reading in all populations including minorities and students with disabilities subgroups.  In order to accomplish these tasks, the administration and faculty implemented the following changes to assist us in meeting the following Title I criteria: 

 

1.      Provide opportunities for all children in the school to meet or exceed Georgia’s proficient and advanced levels of performance.

 

2.      Use of scientifically researched based strategies which are effective in raising student achievement.

 

3.      Use effective instructional methods that increase the quality and amount of learning time.

 

4.      Address the needs of all children, especially those in targeted populations and address how the school will determine if such 

        needs have been met and are consistent with improvement plans under the Educate America Act.

 

Following are examples of the scientifically based research supporting our effective methods and instructional practices or strategies:

 

1.      Scheduling and curriculum changes will be used to facilitate increased academic performance for students.

Strategies Implemented

  • Supplemental math classes for all middle school students which focus on remediation of weak areas.  High school students received supplemental instruction on an as needed basis.
  • Tutors to work specifically with targeted populations in the area of math to increase basic skill levels.  Students are seen individually or in small group.  This work supplements what the teacher is doing in class.  Students are pulled from non-academic classes for a period of 20-40 minutes per week depending on the level of need.
  • Lead teachers, the director, the special education director, and the counselor assist in providing strategies for teachers and tutors to use in assisting students and provide mentoring assistance when needed.  
  • Teachers utilize on-line programs such as USA Test Prep, Scholastic Reading Inventory (SRI), and ALEKS to assist individual student’s areas of weakness to be able to focus on them.
  • Reading across the curriculum is a schoolwide policy which requires students to read in every class and provides for 45 minutes of schoolwide reading daily.
  • Middle and high school teachers meet weekly to discuss students who excel, and those who struggle.  Teachers input narratives into Snapgrades.net for each student and then each student is discussed at least once every 9 weeks with students at risk visited more often.

 

2.      Provide a flexible schedule of before school, in-school, and after school tutoring to all learners, with an emphasis on targeted populations, so they will have an opportunity to increase their academic performance in core areas and on state mandated testing.

 

Strategies Implemented:

  • All teachers provide a tutoring schedule for students.  Teachers require some students to attend after school tutoring.  In addition, the special education director, the counselor, and the director are available before, during, and after school for assistance when needed.  Because of the small environment we have at Charter Conservatory, students have the opportunity to work with teachers they feel most comfortable with.  While our teachers most often tutor in their highly qualified area some of them are available to assist students in other areas.  For example:  our English teacher will help students in history and social studies who are writing papers; our math teacher will help students who are working on chemical equations in science; our social studies teacher will assist students in writing papers for English.  This happens throughout both the middle and high school.  Ultimately the students will receive help from the highly qualified teacher in a subject area but in order to provide the most assistance to the most students sometimes tutoring across the curriculum is needed.
  • USATestPrep is used to assist students in preparing for state-mandated testing (CRCT and GHSGT) and to assist teachers in monitoring for student weaknesses.
  • Prior to the graduation test, all juniors, and those students who have not passed all sections of the GHSGT are given review sessions one to two times per week.  During this 45 minute time period students are given a crash course in core subject areas as well as test taking tips.
  • Prior to the CRCT, a middle schoolwide review, for all grades, will be done in all classes.
  • The Title I director will provide parents with a brief program on helping students pass the graduation test the first time in early March.  The program will be video-taped and linked to our website so all parents may have access to it.
  • A mock writing test is given to all 8th grade and 11th grade students early in the Fall Semester.  Those students who a struggling are given additional assistance, in the form of one-one-one tutoring, prior to the writing test.
  • Credit recovery is offered to all high school students who make D in any academic class.  Each classroom teacher designs a program specifically for each student in order for them to make up their credit.

 

3.      Provide postsecondary experiences, career, and work ready experiences for all students.

 

Strategies Implemented:

  • GaCollege411 speakers to meet with our middle school (grades 7th and 8th) and high school students (grades 10th, 11th, and 12th) to show them how the website can assist them in career development and college planning.
  • Financial aide speakers from the local university to provide one on one guidance to junior and senior student as well as to give an overview of the program.
  • Dual enrollment classes are offered, to juniors and seniors, at the local technical college, the community college, and the university.
  • Speakers from industry around town are invited in by individual teachers to discuss employment rules, and how to operate your own business.  These business leaders come to speak to both our middle school and high school students in assisting to prepare them for their post-secondary career choices.
  • Job shadowing experiences are made available to students who wish to investigate career opportunities.
  • Charter Conservatory will investigate the Upward Bound Program at the local University to see if they can assist our 9th and 10th grade students who qualify for the program.

 

4.      Integrate Technology into the Curriculum in all classes at all grade levels.

 

Strategies Implemented:

  • Technology in the classroom has been an integral part of Charter Conservatory since our charter was first written.  We have one schoolwide computer lab, 2 language arts computer labs, a Title I lab, a laptop lab in the high school, and laptops available in the middle school.
  • All teachers are encouraged to integrate technology into all of their lessons. 
  • We have desktop computers available for students to use at home.
  • We provide professional development for teachers on new technology.
  • We have a project based curriculum which allows students to integrate technology in to their projects.

 

5.      Instructional Strategies for all classes.

 

Strategies Implemented:

  • Rubrics (Appendix B) for all classes and assignments are given to every student.
  • Individual student goal setting with their advisor and parents each 9 weeks (Appendix C).
  • Student-parent-teacher conferences are held every 9 weeks.

 

 

3.      INSTRUCTION BY HIGHLY QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL STAFF


Charter Conservatory has been fortunate to have all full-time core subject are teachers considered highly qualified.  In addition, two of our four tutors are considered highly qualified.  Our Title II-A Coordinator ensures that each non-highly qualified teachers has a remediation plan in place and that they are making headway into becoming highly-qualified.  Charter Conservatory provides funds for non-HiQ teachers to take the GACE exam.

During the school year each teacher meets with the Director to discuss any issues or concerns they have with the teaching process.  In addition, Charter Conservatory provides four PLU credits every year for teachers based on their individual teacher improvement plans.

Strategies to Attract Highly Qualified Teachers to Charter Conservatory

Recruitment - We have about 20 applications yearly for that any given position that is available.  Parents, faculty members at Georgia Southern (mostly our parents), and word of mouth has provided us with an exceptionally fine pool of applicants.  As a small school, we are especially interested in what we term “Renaissance people,” who have interests, talents, and skills across more than a single narrow area.

Our FY09 Highly Qualified percentage was 95%.  Since we do not currently have any paraprofessionals, there is no percentage for them.

When each new teacher is hired his or her Highly Qualified status is evaluated by the Director.  If they are not currently certified, a written plan is developed to assure that they become highly qualified within a specified time frame.  This would first require, within one year’s time, the appropriate subject area testing (GACE) and evaluation of Professional Standard Commission requirements to receive a non-renewable certificate.  When this is accomplished, the second year plan would be revised to include our one-year supervised practicum so that the teacher can receive a clear renewable certification.  Each teacher at Charter Conservatory must attend a conference with the Director every nine week session.  For those candidates who have written plans, their progress will be monitored in these quarterly meetings.  In addition, the Professional Standard Meeting coordinator will schedule quarterly meetings as well to update the PSC system of any completed requirements.  Failure to meet these requirements could result in dismissal from employment.  No candidate is hired without of the required number of credit hours needed to meet the NCLB Highly Qualified definition. 

Furthermore, all teachers at Charter Conservatory teach all students in their areas of designation: Middle School or High School.  Therefore, all students have equitable access to highly qualified teachers who are trained to meet the diverse needs of teachers.  By all middle school and high school teachers teaching all the students in their respective grade areas, equity is assured.

All Title II-A monies are first spent on the subject area tests and other practicum needs of teachers.  If other monies are available, they are used for teachers to attend conferences and join professional organizations.  These are considered by Charter Conservatory to be the most important professional obligations after certification.

 

4. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR STAFF TO ENABLE ALL CHILDREN IN THE SCHOOL TO MEET PERFORMANCE STANDARDS

 

All faculty and staff are included in professional development as appropriate.

 

Charter Conservatory understands the importance of professional development.  We want to be able to provide our teachers with quality instruction that improves their ability to provide information to all students.  In addition, we feel that it is important to help them understand testing, federal programs, school budgets, and personal development.  We try to make sure that we provide a variety of professional development activities throughout the year to cover all the areas that are important to student achievement as well as accommodate any specific teacher requests.  For example: we provided weekly professional development in math for one half of our school year.

 

The results of our parental needs assessment shows that while are teachers do a good job of meeting with their parents of children that some of our parents have a difficult time getting to school activities because they feel we don’t communicate with them in a timely manner.  In addition, we have seen a need for parents to feel comfortable in participating in their child’s education.  Using the data from the needs assessment will help us plan better for professional development that we will offer in the next year.  Some of the proposed areas of learning include: parent involvement in the classroom, communicating with parents, how to address discipline in the classroom, and grant writing for technology.  All areas of professional development will be concerned with strategies to assist teachers in reaching all students.

 

Our professional development activities align with the state standards under the Georgia Professional Standards and student achievement standards.  Regardless of what area we address, all of our professional development is focused on increasing student achievement.

 

We have aligned our professional development with the State’s academic content and student academic achievement standards. We encourage our teachers to attend professional conferences and workshops and expand their own knowledge through involvement in professional organizations related to their subject areas.

 

We are also privileged to be able to provide a practicum experience in accordance with Georgia Professional Standards for our teachers (Appendix D).

 

We have devoted sufficient resources to carry out effectively the professional development activities that address the root causes of academic problems.  For example:

  • Understanding RTI
  • Curriculum Development
  • Differentiation of Instruction for students
  • Multiple Intelligences
  • Constructivism
  • Professional Reading Discussions each 9 weeks
  • Encouraging professional memberships in organizations.

 

5. STRATEGIES TO INCREASE PARENTAL INVOVLEMENT


Charter Conservatory understands the importance of involving parents in a child’s education.  Therefore we actively encourage our parent’s to participate in every aspect of their child’s academics.

 

Involving our middle school parents has been very successful and they are active participants in most events.  However our high school parent participation has been lower than we would like.  In order to increase parental involvement in the high school level and keep our middle school parents involved we have identified some areas which we need to address:

 

  • We will sponsor a quarterly parent meetings (one in the first 9 weeks and third 9 weeks for the middle school and one in the second 9 weeks and fourth nine weeks for the high school) in order to address issues specific for each school in addition to providing a forum for feedback from parents.  These will be in addition to our monthly family fun nights and our individual quarterly parent, student, teacher meetings.
  • We will make better use of our parent liaison to provide assistance in communicating important events to parents.  This person will assist the TI Coordinator in providing workshops to parents throughout the year.
  • We will conduct a yearly needs assessment to determine what our parents consider the most pressing needs.
  • We ask that parents attend quarterly parent, student, and teacher conferences.  During these conferences parents are given a syllabus for the upcoming quarter, grades are discussed, parents are notified of testing dates, and they are given the opportunity to talk with each child’s teachers.
  • We maintain an open-door policy and encourage our parents to meet their children at lunch or to come in and join their child for presentations.
  • During our family fun nights we spotlight different academic areas and encourage students to perform.
  • We ask parents to volunteer at least 9 hours every 9 weeks.  We offer a wide variety of volunteer opportunities for parents.  However, we need to develop ways for parents who are unable to volunteer during normal hours to be able to participate. This is a requirement based on our original charter.  Our governing board and parent liaison are currently working on a plan to reach those parents who are not able to volunteer during traditional hours.
  • We will encourage teachers to take a more active role in communicating early with parents if their child is failing or struggling in class.

Through our needs assessment we learned from parents that they want more opportunities to be involved in their child’s education.  In addition, they would like opportunities to volunteer during non-traditional school hours.  Our parents are very vocal in expressing their needs and we encourage parents to bring us their concerns at any time during the school year.  While our parents have not expressed a strong desire to attend parenting assistance meetings (such as: anger management, motivating their child, etc.) there has been a strong response to providing parents with ways to assist their children academically, especially on state-mandated testing.
 

 

6. PLANS FOR ASSISTING PRESCHOOL CHILDREN IN THE TRANSITION FROM EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS TO LOCAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PROGRAMS


We do not currently offer any preschool services and do not serve children at the elementary school level.  However, should we expand to offer elementary school services in the future, we will put in a procedure in place to address transition services. 

 

In order to prepare elementary school student for the academic and social adjustments to middle school, we offer each and every student the opportunity to shadow a student before the school year starts.  Since we are a year round school, these students can shadow after they have left 5th grade and are on summer vacation.  We also have a 6th grade orientation program for incoming students (Appendix E).  During this presentation, they are introduced to teachers, have the school rules explained, and they have the opportunity to look around and become familiar with the physical layout of the school.  In addition, we have plans to explain our constructivist learning model and the reasons behind some of the more non-traditional offerings we have at Charter Conservatory (such as our 45 minute directed reading class; our lunch policies, parent involvement; etc.).

 

Because of our small class sizes we are able to address any academic concerns of incoming middle school students quickly.  In addition, our open policy allows parents to be involved in the transition planning of their incoming middle school students.

 

Due to the open nature of our school, our middle school students have the opportunity to talk with high school students about the rigors that are expected at the high school level.  We have opportunities for freshman to speak to transitioning 8th grade students about what is expected.  We have found that this creates a more open environment for students to ask questions of their peers.  In addition, we also allow 8th grade to shadow with freshman to get an idea of what is expected at the high school level.

 

Lastly, because of our open environment most of our middle school students know who the high school teachers are after spending a year or two at Charter Conservatory, so the transition does not feel as overwhelming and is not a major disruption to their lives.

 

Prior to starting their freshman year, we have a 9th grade orientation, for parents and students,  where we explain the differences in grading systems, the expectations for coursework, and the required academic testing that is a part of the high school curriculum.  Students and parents are allowed to meet with their teachers and ask any questions they may have.  In addition, our current 9th grade class provides a question and answer seminar toward the end of the year for our 8th grade students who are transitioning to high school.

 

Again, because of our small size, any academic concerns can be quickly addressed and systems put into place to supplement their learning. 

 

All new students, who come to Charter Conservatory, throughout the school year are given the opportunity to shadow students in their grade level.  In fact, we encourage them to do this since our environment differs greatly from traditional educational facilities.  We make every effort to meet the needs of new students who choose to apply to come to Charter Conservatory; since every student is different, their unique needs are taken into consideration.

 

7.MEASURES TO INCLUDE TEACHERS IN THE DECISIONS REGARDING THE USE OF ASSESSMENT TO PROVIDE INFORMATION ON, AND TO IMPROVE THE PERFORMANCE OF INDIVIDUAL STUDENTS AND THE OVERALL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM

 

The faculty at Charter Conservatory is always included in the instructional decisions made through their quarterly meetings with the Director.  Our governing board includes teachers who have input and are representative of the rest of the faculty.

 

All teachers are informed of the results of all standardized tests and we use this information to coordinate programs and implement strategies to help student learning.  The ways that we include teachers in decisions regarding the use of academic assessment are:

 

  • A middle school and high school Continuous Monitoring Team, consisting of all members of the faculty,  meets weekly (middle school meets on Tuesday and high school meets on Wednesday) to discuss student performance and determine how to best improve their individual performance.  Be having all the members of the school faculty on a team we are able to consider how a child is doing across subject areas.  For instance:  Recently we had a high school student who was struggling to complete his work in English, Social Studies, and Study Hall; however, in Geometry he was excelling and getting his work done.  The high school team was able to discuss what the Geometry teacher was doing differently and what interventions she was implementing which were allowing him to be successful in that class.  These teachers then took these suggestions to their own classes and the student has responded favorably to them. 
  • Subject area meetings are held once a month.  Each subject area teacher meets with his or her counterpart at the different school and they discuss standards, strategies, and concerns.
  • The Title I Director and the School Director solicit feedback from teachers on a continual basis in order to improve programs.
  • In class and standardizes assessment results guide the Continuous Monitoring Process and Subject Area Meetings.

 

8.  COORDINATION AND INTEGRATION OF FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL SERVICES AND PROGRAMS, INCLUDING PROGRAMS SUPPORTED UNDER NCLB VIOLENCE PREVENTION PROGRAMS, NUTRITION PROGRAMS, HOUSING PROGRAMS, HEAD START, ADULT EDUCATION, VOCATIONAL/TECHNICAL EDUCATION, AND JOB TRAINING

 

Charter Conservatory integrates federal and state programs. Federal programs we utilize include: Title I Part A; Title II, Part A; Title IV, Part A

 

Quality Basic Education (QBE) are used to fund programs and staff as required by the statue (e.g., salaries, management and operations, professional learning).  At Charter Conservatory, Title I funds are used to supplement our regular academic support services.

 

Our current Title I Targeted-Assisted Plan is developed to coordinate with other programs such as the School-To-Work Opportunities Act of 1994, the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Act, and the National and Community Service Act of 1990.

 

Charter Conservatory works diligently to provide opportunities for all students to be engaged in our internship programs to promote work-readiness skills our student body.  We offer many internships in our school and have worked with local businesses to develop partnerships where students can intern.  In addition we offer dual enrollment opportunities with Georgia Southern University, East Georgia College, and Ogeechee Technical College.

 

Charter Conservatory intends to use the Title I funds it will receive as a designated Schoolwide Program to increase the overall academic performance of all students through enhanced scheduling, before school, in school, and after school tutoring, identifying and capturing those students who may begin to struggle and need additional supports, provide more opportunities for work experiences, support students in their post-secondary endeavors, provide incentives to the student body for both attendance and academic achievements, and increase and update schoolwide technology in classrooms and for all students. Charter Conservatory does not have a school nutrition program at this time.

 

9. ACTIVITIES TO ENSURE THAT ALL STUDENTS WHO EXPERIENCE DIFFICULTY MASTERING STANDARDS SHALL BE PROVIDED WITH EFFECTIVE, TIMELY ASSISTANCE


Charter Conservatory recognizes the urgency in responding to students who are struggling learners.  Student progress is monitored on an on-going basis so that student programs may be revised as needed.  Recognizing and providing additional assistance quickly enables students to meet Georgia’s content standards and student performance standards.  We are providing activities to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering proficient or advanced levels of academic achievement standards shall be provided with effective, timely additional assistance.  Those activities include, but are not limited to:

  • Identifying student’s difficulties in a timely manner:

Ongoing monitoring takes places daily by the teacher in the classroom.  In addition,

  • Charter Conservatory has a comprehensive system in place to identify student weaknesses.  Through our Continuous Monitoring program we are able to discuss each student at least once every nine weeks and more if needed.  Priority is given to targeted-assisted seniors who need credit recovery or are falling behind in their classes, as well as other targeted-assisted students who are failing.  Teachers are required to do assessments each week on every student.  These assessments can be curriculum based and/or behavior based.
  • Every student is tracked each week in Snapgrades where teachers list their standards and  show where each student is through assessments and narrative reports (Appendix F).
  • The Scholastic Reading Inventory (SRI) is used to identify each student’s reading level so that learning can be differentiated for their level to allow them success. This assessment is given twice a year (once at the beginning of the year; once at the end). In addition, we use the ALEKS math program to assess and help our students in areas of math weakness.
  • USATestprep is available to assist students to study for, practice, and master GPS standards covered on the GHSGT and CRCT.  Teachers are able to monitor student progress as they prepare for high-stakes testing.
  • Weekly reviews are offered before high-stakes testing to assist students in reviewing information.

 

  • Periodic training for teachers in the identification of difficulties and appropriate assistance for identified difficulties.
    • Staff development is on-going and focuses on methods and materials to ensure success of all learners:

o   Differentiation

o   Formative, Summative, and Diagnostic Assessment

o   Multiple Intelligences

o   Implementing RTI

o   Technology in the Classroom

o   Classroom Management

o   Constructivism

o   Snapgrades

o   Writing Backward Designs (Sample; Appendix G)

 

  • Teacher-parent-student conferences that detail:

o   What the school will do to help the student

o   Frequent communication with parents by email, phone, and meetings.

o   Promote daily student attendance; personal contact to discuss student absences.

o   Academic and behavioral interventions established by the governing board, faculty and staff.

o   Use of Georgia’s and Charter Conservatory’s Pyramid of Intervention (Appendix H) to support learning.

  • What the parent can do to help their student:

o   Monitor their child’s progress closely by asking questions and paying attention to assignments, and homework.

o   Send their child to school regularly, on time, and to stay the entire day, making appointments after school if possible.

o   Charter Conservatory has an Open Door policy regarding parent involvement and parent’s are welcome to contact the school at anytime

o   To attend school sponsored meetings to meet with teachers and see learn what Charter Conservatory has planned for the rest of the semester.

o   Consider becoming a volunteer or mentor.

  • Additional assistance available to the student at the school or in the community.

o   Teachers and administrators share information about opportunities for struggling students, emphasizing additional academic opportunities such as before, during, and after school tutoring, on-line assistance programs, and RTI Protocols.

o   Utilization of outside agencies to assist families in the education of their children.

o   Utilization of a variety of research based instructional methods and materials based on the needs of each student.

o   Scheduling to maximize instructional time.

o   Focus on monitoring and instruction throughout the year to meet individual student needs.

o   Guidance counselor works individually with students to assist them in planning their post-secondary careers; including job shadowing, work experiences, and college planning.

 

10.  DESCRIPTION OF HOW INDIVIDUAL STUDENT ASSESSMENT RESULTS AND INTERPRETATION WILL BE PROVIDED TO PARENTS

 

Charter Conservatory provides ongoing assessment of student achievement and communication of

assessment results to parents through 9 week progress reports and report cards.  Progress reports are picked up by the parents at the end of every 9 weeks with final report cards picked up at the end of each semester. Should parents fail to come to the meetings (or are unable to attend) teachers will make every effort to meet with parents when they drop off their students or pick them up in the afternoon.  Teachers also make every effort to be available to parents when it is convenient for them (evenings, early mornings, or weekends).  This has helped in getting our parents to the school to meet with teachers.  However, there are always some parents who simply cannot make it to school for conferences.  In these cases, grades are sent home to the parents and a copy is given to the students.  Parents are notified that grades and/or test scores are being sent home through email.

 

While it is our hope that every parents will make an effort to attend these 9 week conferences we are realistic in understanding that it is not always possible.  We make every attempt to communicate to the parents of these children what is expected of them throughout the semester.  We use all means of communication available to both us and the parents including email, phone calls, letters home in the mail, and the student.  We meet with parents in the car line when they pick their students up from school or first thing in the morning when they drop them off. 

 

The school communicates directly with parents through email, telephone calls, and our newsletter.  Information is sent home to parents regarding upcoming assessments as well as information about USATestPrep and the Georgia On-line Assessment System (OAS) for GHSGT and EOCT Practice.

 

Charter Conservatory also uses Family Fun Night, Open House, and the Student Handbook to provide information to parents in verbal and written form regarding how to access individual testing results.  We make every effort to help explain all test terminology and concepts to our parents in an easy to understand manner (and in an appropriate language as needed). Our teachers are trained to understand the results and are available to explain the scores to any parent. 

 

We work hard to make all students a part of the assessment process.  We believe students who have information in a timely fashion will relay that information to parents.  Each course has a syllabus and grading rubric that is given to each student and clearly delineates what is expected.  In addition, we make every student (and parent) aware of the content areas of all high-stakes testing and given them access to study guides.  Test scores are given to parents or sent home with a letter of explanation of the report and are invited to come in and meet with a teacher and/or administrator for further explanation if needed.

 

11.   PROVISIONS FOR THE COLLECTION AND DISAGGREGATION OF DATA ON THE ACHIEVEMENT AND ASSESSMENT RESULTS OF STUDENTS

 

The system testing coordinator ensures that all state level testing data is collected according to state guidelines.  The Georgia Department of Education and the Governor’s Office of Student Accountability disaggregate the data and provide documentation to the system and the school.  School administrators review the data with the teachers and develop plans based on the outcomes to increase student achievement. 

 

Student ethnicity is identified by a state developed ethnicity form and we collect free and reduced lunch information.  Each of these is collected at the beginning of the school year and we compare it with state databases for accuracy.

 

12.   PROVISIONS TO ENSURE THAT DISAGGREGATED ASSESSMENT RESULTS FOR EACH CATEGORY ARE VALID AND RELIABLE

 

State mandated assessments, GHSGT, GHSWT, EOCT, and CRCT results provide disaggregated data that is used for analysis.   Beginning in 2010 we will use the ITBS and ITED, which are considered reliable and valid, to compare with the State mandated assessments.  In addition, due to our small size, we will be comparing test mean and median data.  Typically we disaggregate test data on all students in addition to students with disabilities, African-American students, and white students.

 

We double check information coming from the Department of Education to ensure that scores are reported accurately.  We do this by checking the SIFS.

 

We follow all test protocols set up by the Department of Education.

 

 

13.  PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC REPORTING OF DISAGGREGATED DATA


The system testing coordinator ensures that all state level testing data is collected according to state guidelines.  The Georgia Department of Education and the Governor’s Office of Student Accountability disaggregate data and provide documentation to the system, school, and the public.  We will conduct our own analysis as well, comparing both individual and schoolwide results.

School administrators review the data with teachers and disaggregate the trends so that student needs can be more efficiently met.

Our charter currently states that we will report the median data of test scores and Charter Conservatory will use the school web site, school newsletter, and local paper (Statesboro Herald) to report scores. 

 

14.  PLAN DEVELOPED DURING A ONE YEAR PERIOD, UNLESS LEA, AFTER CONSIDERING THE RECOMMENDATION OF ITS TECHNICAL PROVIDERS DETERMINE THAT LESS TIME IS NEEDED TO DEVELOP AND IMPLEMENT THE SCHOOLWIDE PROGRAM.

 

Charter Conservatory has been a targeted-assisted school this past year.  However, based on our school improvement plan and input from teachers it was decided that a school-wide program would better serve all their students.  We are a small school with limited resources as it is and this makes it difficult to ensure that only Title I students have access to equipment and tutors, since many of our non-targeted assisted students are borderline between needing assistance and not qualifying for assistance.  While our ranking criteria takes into account those students who may perform well in class but not on tests, as well as those students who perform poorly in class but do well on testing, it nonetheless reduces students to a number.  This does not always adequately reflect the actual ability or needs of the student.

 

In addition to this, our school improvement plan has the following school-wide components:

  • 42% economically disadvantaged students (free and reduced lunch)
  • Schoolwide reform strategies to raise the achievement level of all students
  • Instruction by highly-qualified teachers
  • Strategies to hire and retain highly-qualified teachers
  • Research-based professional development
  • Strategies to increase parental involvement
  • Teacher participation in assessment decisions
  • Strategies to assist struggling students and students in need
  • Methods of informing all parents about student data
  • Methods for making the school improvement plan public.

Charter Conservatory will review the Schoolwide plan at the end of each school year (June). This will allow us to make necessary changes and implement those changes at the beginning of each school year.  Should the need arise to address concerns during the school year an amendment to the Schoolwide plan will be conducted with all members of the writing/planning committee present.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHARTER CONSERVATORY SCHOOLWIDE PLANNING TIME LINE

  1. LEA Establishes School Eligibility

Prior to Planning Year

  1. LEA Notifies School of Eligibility

Spring Prior to Planning Year

  1. School Consults with Stakeholders/Makes the Decision to Become Schoolwide

Prior to August 15 of Planning Year

  1. LEA Sends letter of intent (of form) to Notify SEA of Schoolwide Plan Development

By August 15 of Planning Year

  • Designates high Quality technical Assistance Providers

July-August Planning Year – Charter Conservatory – Memie Collins

  • Identifies Writing Team Members

August of Planning Year – Charter Conservatory – see Page 2 of plan

  • Develops comprehensive needs assessment

August-November of planning year-Charter Conservatory - developed

  1. LEA engages in planning and writing process

November-March of planning year

  1. LEA sends draft of schoolwide plan to Governing Board

March of planning year

  1. LEA sends DRAFT of plan to Title I Area Specialist

April 30 of planning year

  1. TI Area Specialist Responds

May 30 of planning year

  1. LEA Submits revised/edited plan

June 30 of planning year

  1. SEA notifies LEA to Include SWP Status on Con App

July 31 of Implementation Year

  1. SEA sends SWP Approval Letter from SEA

August 1 of Implementation Year

  1. School begins Implementation of SWP

August 1

 

This plan serves to fulfill all the requirements for obtaining Schoolwide Title I Status.

 

15. PLAN DEVELOPED WITH THE INVOLVEMENT OF THE COMMUNITY TO BE SERVED AND INDIVIDUALS WHO WILL CARRY OUT THE PLAN INCLUDING TEACHERS, PRINCIPALS, OTHER SCHOOL STAFF, AND PUPIL SERVICE PERSONNEL, PARENTS AND STUDENTS

 

The Title I Team of Charter Conservatory consists of team leaders, teachers, parents, administrators, the counselor, and the business manager.  Because Charter Conservatory is a small school and system many people wear different hats in the building.  By including them in the development and writing of this plan we have made every attempt to ensure a fair and equitable plan.  This Team has been the force behind becoming a schoolwide Title I school as many of these people are on the front lines every day and know the student needs better than most. 

 

Parent and stakeholder surveys were sent requesting feedback concerning the school and what we could do to improve.  The information was (and will be used) to write the schoolwide plan for 2010-2011.

 

 

16.  PLAN AVAILABLE TO LEA, PARENTS, AND THE PUBLIC


A copy of Charter Conservatory’s Targeted-Assisted Plan is available to parents and stakeholders upon request.  When our schoolwide plan is approved by all appropriate parties we will make that readily available as well. 

A copy of our current Targeted-Assisted Plan (and subsequent Schoolwide Plan) is kept in a notebook at the front desk of the school.  Any parent wishing to have a copy is welcome to request one and it will be given to them.  At our first TI Parent Meeting in March we will make copies of the plan available to the parents who attend.

 

17.  PLAN IS TRANSLATED TO THE EXTENT FEASIBLE, INTO ANY LANGUAGE THAT A SIGNIFICANT PERCENTAGE OF THE PARENTS OF PARTICIPATING STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL SPEAK AS THEIR PRIMARY LANGUAGE

 

Every attempt is made at Charter Conservatory to have items translated should the need arise.  Currently all of our students and parents speak English as their primary language at home and in school.  Should the need arise to have documents translated we have access to a foreign language teacher, and university professors who have agreed to translate for us. 

 

The school does have access to the DOE Transact Program which provides translated materials for other languages if the need arises.

 

18. PLAN IS SUBJECT TO THE SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PROVISIONS OF SECTION 1116

 

Charter Conservatory abides by the requirements of the School Improvement provisions of Title I, Section 1116 which requires us to monitor approved providers that we use for increasing student achievement.

 

Charter Conservatory is not currently a Needs Improvement School and therefore has not had to utilize additional service providers.  However, should the need arise in the future we will follow the guidelines of Title I, Section 1116.

 

 

Appendix A: Student Data for Georgia Assessments and Other Indicators

Assessment data on state and national tests for Charter Conservatory are listed below:

2009 End of Course Tests (SPRING EOCT): PLEASE NOTE SMALL SAMPLE SIZE.

 

ALL STUDENTS

Does Not Meet 

Meets or Exceeds 

9th Literature/Composition (5)

-

100%

Amer. Lit/Composition(13)

-

100%

Geometry (8)

62.5%

37.5%

Biology (0)

-

-

Physical Science (15)

-

-

US History (0)

-

-

Economics (12)

58.3%

41.6%

Algebra I (9)

55.5%

44%

 

Students w/ Disabilities

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

9th Literature/Composition (2)

-

100%

Amer. Lit/Composition(1)

-

100%

Geometry (1 test taker)

100%

-

Biology (0)

-

-

Physical Science (0)

-

-

US History (0)

-

-

Economics (4 test takers)

75%

25%

Algebra I (3 test takers)

66.6%

33.3%

 

African –American Students

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

9th Literature/Composition (1)

-

100%

Amer. Lit/Composition (1)

-

100%

Geometry (1)

100%

-

Biology (0)

-

-

Physical Science (0)

-

-

US History (0)

-

-

Economics  (2)

100%

-

Algebra I (2)

100%

-

 

White Students

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

9th Literature/Composition (4)

-

100%

Amer. Literature/Comp(12)

-

100%

Geometry  (7)

57.4%

43%

Biology (0)

-

-

Physical Science (10)

10%

90%

US History (0)

-

-

Economics (10)

60%

40%

Algebra I (7)

43%

57.4%

 

3 Year Comparison of EOCT Results

CCAT 9th Lit & Comp % Passing (Spring)

2007

2008

2009 (5)

ALL

NA

NA

100

SWD

NA

NA

100 (2)

Black

NA

NA

100 (1)

White

NA

NA

100

 

CCAT American Lit % Passing (Spring)

 

2007 (14)

2008

2009(13)

ALL

57

NA

100

SWD

60 (4)

NA

100 (1)

Black

0 (2)

NA

NA

White

57

NA

100

 

CCAT Geometry % Passing (Spring)

2007 (8)

2008

2009(8)

ALL

62.5

90

38

SWD

50 (2)

50 (2)

0 (1)

Black

100 (1)

NA

0 (1)

White

57

90

43

 

CCAT Physical Science % Passing (Spring) 

2006

2007 (7)

2008(15)

ALL

56

86

91

SWD

75

100 (2)

100 (1)

Black

NA

50 (2)

NA

White

56

83

91

 

 

 

CCAT Economics % Passing

 

2007 (12)

2008

2009 (12)

ALL

42

54

42

SWD

0 (1)

0 (1)

0 (4)

Black

0 (1)

NA

0 (2)

White

42

54

50

 

CCAT Algebra I % Passing (Spring)

2007(13)

2008

2009(9)

ALL

38

56

44

SWD

50 (2)

33 (3)

33 (3)

Black

0 (1)

0 (1)

0 (1)

White

38

63

50

 

08-09 GHSGT (Georgia High School Graduation Test) – PLEASE NOTE SMALL SAMPLE SIZE.

All Students

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts (17)

5

95

Math (17)

11

88

Social Studies (18)

5

95

Science (18)

11

88

 

SWD

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts (3)

0

100

Math (3)

66

33

Social Studies (3)

33

66

Science (3)

33

66

 

Black Students

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts (1)

0

100

Math (1)

0

100

Social Studies (2)

50

50

Science (2)

50

50

 

White Students

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts (16)

6

94

Math (16)

11

88

Social Studies  (15)

6

94

Science (15)

11

88

 

3 Year Comparison of ALL GHSGT First Time Test Takers

11th Grade ALL First Time Test Takers –ELA

 

2007

2008

2009

ALL

100 (17)

95 (16)

95 (17)

SWD

100 (5)

50 (2)

100 (3)

Black

100 (2)

100 (1)

100 (1)

White

100 (15)

95 (15)

94 (16)

11th Grade ALL First Time Test Takers - Math

 

2007

2008

2009

ALL

100 (19)

95 (16)

88 (17)

SWD

100 (4)

100 (2)

33(3)

Black

100 (2)

100 (1)

100 (1)

White

100 (17)

95 (15)

89 (16)

 

 

11th Grade ALL First Time Test Takers - Science

 

2007

2008

2009

ALL

79 (19)

100 (16)

88 (18)

SWD

100 (4)

100 (2)

66 (3)

Black

0 (2)

100 (1)

50 (2)

White

88 (17)

100 (15)

95 (16)

11th Grade ALL First Time Test Takers – Social Studies

 

2007

2008

2009

ALL

94 (18)

81 (16)

88 (18)

SWD

80 (5)

50 (2)

66 (3)

Black

100 (2)

0 (1)

50 (2)

White

100 (16)

87 (15)

95 (16)

 

08-09- 8th grade CRCT (Criterion Referenced Competency Test) – PLEASE NOTE SAMPLE SIZE.

All Students (20)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts

10%

90%

Math

70%

30%

Social Studies

65%

35%

Science

55%

45%

Reading

10%

90%

 

SWD (4)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts

-

100%

Math

66%

33%

Social Studies

66%

33%

Science

33%

66%

Reading

-

100%

 

Black Students (4)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts

-

100%

Math

80%

20%

Social Studies

60%

40%

Science

60%

40%

Reading

25%

75%

 

White Students (16)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts

13%

87%

Math

66%

33%

Social Studies

66%

33%

Science

53%

47%

Reading

7%

93%

 

 

 

3 Year Comparison of 8th Grade CRCT Scores

 

8th Grade First Time Test Takers –English

2007

2008

2009

ALL

77 (22)

86 (21)

90 (20)

SWD

33 (4)

100 (5)

100 (4)

Black

60 (4)

50 (2)

100 (4)

White

95 (18)

89 (19)

89 (16)

 

8th Grade First Time Test Takers - Reading 

2007

2008

2009

ALL

50 (22)

67 (21)

90 (20)

SWD

0 (4)

50 (5)

50 (4)

Black

20 (4)

0 (2)

20 (4)

White

55 (18)

63 (19)

33 (16)

 

8th Grade First Time Test Takers – Mathematics 

2007

2008

2009

ALL

73 (22)

57 (21)

45 (20)

SWD

0 (4)

50 (5)

100 (4)

Black

20 (4)

0 (2)

40 (4)

White

100 (18)

79 (19)

67 (16)

 

8th Grade First Time Test Takers - Science

2007

2008

2009

ALL

73 (22)

57 (21)

35 (20)

SWD

 50 (4)

50 (5)

50 (4)

Black

25 (4)

0 (2)

40 (4)

White

 77 (18)

63 (19)

27 (16)

 

 

8th Grade First Time Test Takers – Social Studies

 

2007

2008

2009

ALL

82 (22)

57 (21)

35 (20)

SWD

75 (4)

40 (5)

33 (4)

Black

25 (4)

0 (2)

40 (4)

White

94 (18)

63 (19)

33 (16)

 

 

08-09- 7th grade CRCT (Criterion Referenced Competency Test) – PLEASE NOTE SMALL SAMPLE SIZE.

All Students (25)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts

8%

92%

Math

16%

84%

Social Studies

-

-

Science

32%

68%

Reading

-

100%

 

SWD (4)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts

25%

75%

Math

75%

25%

Social Studies

-

-

Science

75%

25%

Reading

-

100%

 

Black Students (5)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts

-

100%

Math

20%

80%

Social Studies

-

-

Science

20%

80%

Reading

-

100%

 

White Students (20)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts

10%

90%

Math

15%

85%

Social Studies

-

-

Science

35%

65%

Reading

-

100%

 

 

7th Grade First Time Test Takers – ELA

 

2007

2008

2009

ALL

85 (20)

94 (16)

92 (25)

SWD

50 (4)

66 (3)

75  (4)

Black

50 (3)

100 (4)

100 (5)

White

85 (17)

92 (12)

90 (20)

 

7th Grade First Time Test Takers – Reading

2007

2008

2009

ALL

90 (20)

75 (16)

100 (25)

SWD

66 (4)

66 (3)

100 (4)

Black

50 (3)

50 (4)

100 (5 )

White

80 (17)

83 (12)

100 (20)

 

7th Grade First Time Test Takers – Math

2007

2008

2009

ALL

80 (20)

63 (16)

84 (25)

SWD

33 (4)

33 (3)

25 (4)

Black

50 (3)

25 (4)

80 (5)

White

75 (17)

75 (12)

90 (20)

 

7th Grade First Time Test Takers – Science

2007

2008

2009

ALL

80 (20)

69 (16)

68 (25)

SWD

66 (4)

66 (3)

25 (4)

Black

50 (3)

50 (4)

80 (5)

White

75 (17)

75 (12)

65 (20)

 

08-09- 6th grade CRCT (Criterion Referenced Competency Test) – PLEASE NOTE SMALL SAMPLE SIZE.

All Students (15)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts

13%

87%

Math

33%

67%

Social Studies

-

-

Science

47%

53%

Reading

7%

93%

 

SWD (1)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts

-

100%

Math

100%

-

Social Studies

-

-

Science

100%

-

Reading

-

100%

 

Black Students (2)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts

50%

50%

Math

100%

-

Social Studies

-

-

Science

100%

-

Reading

-

100%

 

White Students (12)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

English Language Arts

8%

92%

Math

25%

75%

Social Studies

-

-

Science

42%

56%

Reading

8%

92%

 

 

6th Grade First Time Test Takers – ELA

2007

2008

2009

ALL

83 (12)

84 (19)

87 (15)

SWD

66 (3)

33 (3)

100 (1)

Black

66 (3)

80 (5)

66 (3)

White

75 (9)

80 (14)

92 (12)

 

6th Grade First Time Test Takers – Math

2007

2008

2009

ALL

50 (12)

63 (19)

67 (15)

SWD

0 (3)

0 (3)

0 (1)

Black

33 (3)

20 (5)

0 (3)

White

42 (9)

67 (14)

92 (12)

 

6th Grade First Time Test Takers – Reading

2007

2008

2009

ALL

100 (12)

100 (19)

93 (15)

SWD

100 (3)

100 (3)

100 (1)

Black

100 (3)

100 (5)

100 (3)

White

100 (9)

100 (14)

92 (12)

 

6th Grade First Time Test Takers – Science

2007

2008

2009

ALL

58 (12)

68 (19)

53 (15)

SWD

100 (3)

50 (3)

0 (1)

Black

66 (3)

60 (5)

0 (3)

White

75 (9)

71 (14)

53 (12)

08-09- 8th grade Writing Test – PLEASE NOTE SMALL SAMPLE SIZE.

All Students (20)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

Writing Test

30%

70%

White Students (14)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

Writing Test

21%

79%

SWD(3)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

Writing Test

33%

66%

Black Students (6)

Does Not Meet

Meets or Exceeds

Writing Test

50%

50%

 

3 year comparison of the 8th Grade First Time Test Takers – Writing Test

 

2007

2008

2009

ALL

55 (22)

70 (23)

71 (20)

SWD

0 (5)

29 (7)

66 (3)

Black

0 (4)

0 (3)

40 (5)

White

62 (18)

89 (20)

79 (15)

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